Orillia

HOME INSPECTIONS

WETT Inspections

By the Orillia Home Inspector

Certified Building Code Official

 

Wood Energy Technical Training (WETT)

 

Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc. (WETT Inc.) is a non-profit training and education association managed by a volunteer Board of Directors elected by holders of valid WETT certificates. Through its administrative designate, WETT Inc. functions as the national registrar of the WETT program. Through professional training and public education, WETT Inc. promotes the safe and effective use of wood burning systems in Canada. 

In carrying out its mandate to promote increased safety and effectiveness, WETT Inc. maintains the Wood Energy Technical Training program (WETT). The program is
designed to:

  •  provide training to those who offer wood energy products and installation and maintenance services to the public and to those who conduct inspections of wood burning systems,

  • confirm and recognize the knowledge and skills acquired through field experience, self-study and successful completion of WETT courses by issuing certificates of qualification,

  • provide training to specialty audiences as the need and demand arises.

The WETT system consists of several courses recognizing the various types of work done by wood energy professionals. Certification is achieved by completing courses to earn educational credits. A technical reference manual has been prepared to assist trainees in preparing for courses and as a reference manual for certificate holders. 

WETT trained professionals must abide by a code of ethics requiring professionalism in all aspects of their work. The installation and maintenance of wood burning appliances is not regulated in Canada. As a non-profit training and educational association, WETT does not oversee, nor is it responsible for, the workmanship of its members. As such, WETT does not act as a regulator. WETT does maintain internal processes to address breaches of our code of ethics, however WETT cannot become involved in resolving consumer disputes.


Objectives of WETT

  • To develop, maintain, promote and deliver professional training courses within the framework of the Wood Energy Technical Training Program (WETT) for practitioners of trades related to the sale, installation, maintenance and inspection of systems using wood and other biomass fuels.

  • To maintain a registry containing the names of holders of valid WETT certificates and those who are students under the program.

  • To foster and promote among certificate holders the highest level of professional conduct in the delivery of services to the public.

  • To encourage and promote the safe and efficient use of wood energy through the distribution of public information materials and through collaboration with government agencies and related industries.

  • To foster and promote research and education in utilization of wood as a source of energy.

  • To promote the interests and activities of the members of the organization in a reasonable and legal manner.

  • To provide a forum for the discussion of issues of importance or interest to the members and to share information and opinions for the mutual benefit of the members.
  • To carry on such other activities as may, from time to time, be ordered by the Board of Directors of the organization and which are consistent with these objectives.


Wood Safety Information and Chimney Installation


 

 

 

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Complete resource for wood burning technology and information for the home owner.

 

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Inspection Definitions


1. Chimney - vent flue gases from fireplaces or heating equipment.
2.  Chimney flue top or chimney cap (if present)
3.  Chimney crown or chimney top seal
4.  Chimney Flashing seals the roof penetration to avoid leaks into the structure.
5. Masonry fireplace
6. Fireplace ash pit door. 
7.  Fireplace ash pit cleanout door.
8.  Fireplace mantel - horizontal trim attached to wall above fireplace opening.
9. Hearth - flat surface in front of the fireplace, protects flooring from fire.
10. Ridge cap or ridge vent (if present)
11. Ridge board
12. Cripple rafters or Jack rafters (between chimney and house eaves - rafters that do not extend the full distance between house eaves and the roof ridge board)
13. Rafter blocking or cross bridging, also found on floor joists and in some wall framing
14. Soffit or lookout or house eaves. The soffit is the enclosed portion of the roof that overhangs the house walls at the roof lower edges.
15. Roof sheathing or roof decking.
16. Roof shingles (asphalt shingles, clay tiles, slates, wood shingles, or shakes, similar materials)
17. Drip edge (used at lower roof edges or eaves). The drip edge is special metal flashing intended to divert water off of the roof lower edges into the roof gutter system. Drip edges should spill into the gutter, not behind it. 
18. Gutter (attached over or to fascia board) to collect roof drainage and prevent it from spilling down and along the building walls (leaks) and basement (wet basements
19. Downspouts (conduct roof drainage from the gutters to a destination away from the building or into a storm drain system).
20.  Downspout leader or downspout extension (hard to see, behind that front right entry porch column)
21. Gable end and gable-end attic vent. The gable end the house wall on a conventional simple gable roof such as shown in our sketch is the triangular end wall
22. Gable end fascia. The gable end fascia is the trim board attached to the roof edges, extending from ridge to lower roof edge, and where a rake overhang is present, covering the outermost rake rafter or barge rafter.
23. Gable end vent or attic vent at gable end